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Physics

What is Physics?

Physics is the branch of science that studies matter, energy and the relationship between them. Understanding the laws of Physics gives us a better view of the world we live in. If you are curious enough to wonder about any of the following questions, then you should enjoy studying Physics. 

 

  • Why do I see colours on my C.D?
  • How does a generator produce electricity?
  • Why is there sometimes a rainbow when it's wet?
  • How can we see inside a person's body with an X-ray machine?
  • How do the speed guns of the Gardaí work?
  • What are mirages and how do they occur?
  • Why do vibrating waves produce sound?

In Leaving Certificate Physics you will study various topics in each of the following areas. Mechanics and Motion (5th year), Heat (5th year), Waves and Sound (5th year), Light and Optics (5th year), Electricity and Magnetism (6th year), Atomic Physics and The Electron (6th year) and Nuclear and Particle Physics (optional)

There are 25 compulsory experiments in Leaving Certificate Physics. Four of these are asked in Section A of the exam and you must answer three. Pupils generally do well here as we focus a lot of attention on experiments and we tend to repeat them closer to exam time. In addition, some of these experiments can be asked in Section B.

 

 

 

 

Mandatory Experiment Procedures (*with past questions)
 Light Experiments
 To find the focal length of a Concave Mirror
 To find the focal length  of a Converging Lens
 To find the wavelength of a monochromatic light source
 To verify snell's Law (RI of a Solid)
 To verify snell's Law (RI of a liquid)
 Heat Experiments 
 To find the SHC of water by the electrical method
 To find the specific latent heat of fusion of ice
 To measure the specific latent heat of vaporisation of water
 To plot the calibration curve of a thermometer using the laboratory mercury thermometer as standard
 Sound Experiments
 To measure the speed of sound in Air
 To show that the fundamental frequency of a stratche string is inversely proportional to its length
 To show that the fundamnetal frequency of a stretched string is proportional to the square of its tension
 Mechanics Experiments
 To verify Boyle's Law
 To measure the value of 'g' by means of the simple pendulum
 To measure constant velocity using a ticker tape timer
 To verify the principle of conservation of momentum
 To show that the acceleration of a body is proportional to the applied force
 
 
 
 


Leaving Certificate past Papers and Marking Schemes
 

 

Physics Papers
Physics Marking Schemes

L.C. 2002

L.C. 2002 Marking Scheme

L.C. 2003

L.C. 2003 Marking Scheme
L.C. 2004 L.C. 2004 Marking Scheme
L.C. 2005 L.C. 2005 Marking Scheme
L.C. 2006 L.C. 2006 Marking Scheme
L.C. 2007 L.C. 2007 Marking Scheme
L.C. 2008 L.C. 2008 Marking Scheme
L.C. 2009 L.C. 2009 Marking Scheme
L.C. 2010 L.C. 2010 Marking Scheme
L.C. 2011 L.C. 2011 Marking Scheme
 L.C. 2012  L.C. 2012 Marking Scheme
 L.C. 2013 L.C. 2013 Marking Scheme
 L.C. 2014  L.C. 2014 Marking Scheme
L.C. 2015
 
   
   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Books
Textbook:
Real World Physics by Dan O'Regan.

The following books are available from our library:

  • Electronics for Today and Tomorrow by Tom Duncan.
  • Advanced Physics by Tom Duncan.
  • Modern Elementary Particle Physics by Gordan Kane.
  • Particle Physics by Arthur Beiser.
  • A Laboratory manual of Physics by F. Tyler.
  • Leaving Certificate Physics by Donal Collins.
  • How Things Work: The Physics of Everyday Life by L.A. Bloomfield.

Useful Web Addresses

http://www.falstad.com/ripple/
This applet is a simulation of a ripple tank

http://www.walter-fendt.de/ph11e/
Java applets on Physics

http://www.colorado.edu/physics/2000/index.pl
A collection of Applets from X-Ray machines to Microwave ovens to the Periodic Table of Elements.

http://www.rpii.ie
The Radiological Institute of Ireland.

http://oldmanhonda.com
****An excellent gateway site to various Physics applets****


Useful Summaries

Chapter 6 Chapter 7 Chapter 8 Chapter 9 Chapter 10 Chapter 11

To measure the constant acceleration of a trolley using a ticker tape timer and ticker tape
To show that the acceleration of a body is y proportional to the force acting on it


Useful Past House Exams

5th Year Summer 2005         5th Year Christmas 2006

Physics Proofs
physicsproofs

Atomic Physics Maths Questions and Answers
atomic_physics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Physical Education

Over the 6-year cycle, the school aims to offer students as wide ranging a PE programme as possible. All students in the school take physical education as a subject.

 

Years
Time for Physical Education
First

1 Hour and Thirty minutes

This programme introduces students to field hockey, basketball, gymnastics, dance, athletics, rounders and tennis, giving students the basic skills necessary to participate in the activity. All activities covered are on a modular basis.

Second

Forty Minutes

The programme continues with the First Year modules and develops a better awareness of the skills, rules and teamwork necessary to participate in team and individual sports.

Third

Forty Minutes

Students are introduced to Gaelic football, badminton, circuit training, volleyball and have one module of dance and rounders.

Fifth

Forty Minutes

Students continue with the Third Year programme with trampoline and indoor sports as an extra module. First aid may also be offered depending on class size.

Sixth

Forty Minutes

Students are given an opportunity to select activities that they would wish to participate in. Each activity selected lasts a minimum of four to six weeks. First aid may also be offered depending on class size.

Transition

Two Hours

Students get the opportunity to experience activities not covered in the general programme. Activities such as sailing, pitch and putt, windsurfing, aerobics, self defence, dance, grooming and skiing may be offered as part of the PE programme. The activities covered may change from year to year depending on numbers and availability. The Transition Year programme hopes to develop students ability to work as part of a team and also to develop new life skills.

 

After school, activities /team sports take place Monday to Friday from 3.30pm to 5.00pm. The sports covered are basketball, camogie, soccer and badminton while cross country training takes place at lunch time. The school takes part in the cross country championships and the Leinster Track and Field championships. Each year the school competes in the Inter Dominican Sports day.

During lunch time the sports hall is used on alternate days for basketball shooting skills, indoor soccer, trampoline and badminton for beginners.

A whole school sports day is organised in the third term with class leagues in basketball, soccer, rounders and tennis also taking place in the third term.

Students who have achieved a high standard in a sport not catered for on campus are given the opportunity to represent the school at selected events.

In general, the PE and sports programme aims to develop the physical ability of each student through a varied programme of activity. Every student in the school is encouraged to participate in all activities on offer.

The PE uniform for the school is a tracksuit consisting of black bottoms wine sweatshirt with school crest and white polo shirt.

Maths

projectmathslogo.jpg
Learning maths is fun
http://www.mathsisfun.com/fractions-menu.html





Pizza is divided into 8 portions. Where has 1/8th gone??
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What is the most popular colour?

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Why did the m&m go to school?                                                           To beome a smartie!!!



Maths Week in Dominican College


Maths Week in Dominican College aims to raise awareness, appreciation and understanding of mathematics for all. Maths is needed in today's world and those people with poor proficiency in Maths will be disadvantaged in life. In addition we need to encourage more young people to work harder at Maths in school to progress on to areas such as Maths itself,
engineering, science, accountancy etc. All too common we hear people say "I can't do Maths" and this leads to an idea that you have to be hardwired for Maths. Of course, not everyone will become a top mathematician but everyone can do better than they do and many could learn to enjoy Maths if we can break this "cycle of fear". The events of Maths Week are designed to present Maths as interesting, challenging and yet rewarding - and yes, even fun! Link : www.mathsweek.ie

A TIMETABLE OF EVENTS PROMOTING MATHS WEEK IN DOMINICAN COLLEGE OCT 12TH – 17TH 2009

EVENT
DATE
TARGET YEAR GROUP
Prizes
“Magic of Maths” Lecture in RDS
Monday Oct 12th
ALL TY’S
N/A
Math’s Quiz
-powerpoint
Wednesday Oct 14th
-All First Years, during class time
Prize at Assembly following week
Math’s Quiz
-powerpoint
Wednesday Oct 14th
All Second Years during class time

Prize at Assembly following week
Sudoka
Thursday Oct 15th
All Students
-In Library at lunch time.
-Interested students must give their names to
Ms. Tracy or Ms. Mohan
-Winners announced Friday 325pm over PA.
-Collect prize then
Brainteasers on line
Math’s Week
Last day to submit  Thurs 14th
All Classes
- e-mail your answer to :
(email will be updated shortly)
-Winners announced Friday 325pm over PA.
-Collect prize then
Poster Competition
Due Tues Oct 13th
1st Years
Prize at Assembly following week
Brainteasers in class
Every Day
Non- Exam Classes





Why study Mathematics?

Mathematics is about developing an understanding of numbers and measuring. It helps to prepare for many practical aspects of day-to-day living. It enables the learner to think logically and solve problems, which are skills for life. Engineering, computing, architecture, business and, in fact, every possible career choice will involve one or more aspects of Mathematics. Without Maths, we would not have the technology to surf the Internet, build a bridge, weigh ourselves, design or manufacture a car, fly an aeroplane, use a mobile phone…

What is the best way to study Mathematics?

A common problem faced by students of Mathematics is that when presented with a Maths problem, it can be hard to establish a correct starting point. When prompted in class by a teacher or fellow student, they know how to complete the task but without that assistance at home can feel very lost. It is essential to take useful notes and tips from class, which can easily be understood later. This will prove invaluable when studying at home.

How should Maths be studied at home?

Revise the material learned in class that day. This should include:
1. Mathematical concepts.
2. new Mathematical terms/vocabulary.
3. working through examples shown in class.

Use examples from the textbook and class to help you but make every effort to understand them instead of just trying to make your exercises look like the examples.

Answer the homework questions by showing the methodology used as well as the answers. When a question is completed, always ensure that the answer makes sense. Eg. Make sure that a table that you should calculate to be 2m in length is not found to be 2cm or 20m!

Remember........................
The best way to study Mathematics is to actually work out questions for yourself.

Useful Websites for Mathematics

A very comprehensive gateway site (a site that categorises and links to lots of other sites). It contains sections on:
General Topics, Geometry, Fractals, History of Mathematics and Mathematical Software
http://www.tc.cornell.edu/EDU/MathSciGateway/general.asp

Some fun numeracy games here can be played online. A good way to practise against the clock!
http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/megamaths/

This is part of one of the most famous sites for mathematics education: the Maths Forum at Swarthmore. There are many categorised links to other pages.
http://mathforum.org/library/

This is a search engine and yields Yahoo's categorisation of many mathematical sites.
http://dir.yahoo.com/science/mathematics/

This site is loaded with problems and games for both teachers and students. It is definitely worth a look!
http://www.mathgoodies.com/

This site contains multiple levels of games for any age group. All are colourful and easy to follow.
http://www.coolmath.com/

Music

Music is a central part of both curricular and extra-curricular life at Dominican College. There are many opportunities to get involved. Music is available as a subject at both junior and senior levels. The first year programme in music introduces students to the skills of listening and composing as well as giving a firm understanding of music theory and concepts. All first years are involved in class-based singing. Students preparing for Junior and Leaving Certificate Music also obtain the skills of listening, performing and composing. Many of our Leaving Cert students go on to study music at Third level. In 2000, Sarah Picardo (6th year) was awarded The Ó Cillín medal for being the student who obtained the highest marks in Music in the Leaving Certificate in the country. Well done Sarah!

A non-academic music appreciation class is offered to all first years entering Dominican College so that every student gets to enjoy some aspects of music.

There are also other opportunities to get involved in music in the school. Second and fifth year students participate in a two-part and three-part choir respectively. Here students both with and without instrumental ability get an opportunity to present a high standard of choral singing. They are entered into the Department of Education's choir exam for secondary schools and the final result is always outstanding.

Another group that works diligently throughout the school year is the Traditional Irish Music Group. Here students focus on learning and performing Irish tunes. It is an interesting and welcomed contrast to the other musical activities going on in the school.

Last but not least are the school choir and orchestra who for many years now have provided the music and singing for numerous occasions relating to the school life of the college. The group is at its biggest for many years and is the backbone of musical life in the school. For some of our 6th years who graduated in May, this was the sixth graduation at which they had either sung or played. The staff of the Music Department is very grateful and appreciative to both the students and their parents for their commitment to music in Dominican College.

Useful Website Addresses:

http://www.classical.net
http://classicalmusic.about.com
http://www.cmc.ie
http://www.irish-music.net
http://www.lyricfm.ie
http://www.thebeatles.com

Click This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to mail the Music Department.

Latin

Welcome to the Latin Web Page


We offer Latin to all First Year Students entering Dominican College. This is conditional on a sufficient number of students opting for Latin to allow us to form a class. Latin is not offered in any other Girls Secondary School on the north side of the city.

  • All students taking Latin will continue to completion of the Junior Certificate course at the end of Third Year.
  • Leaving Certificate Latin is also offered at Dominican College. This, of course is conditional on a sufficient number of students opting for this subject.


WHY SHOULD YOUR DAUGHTER STUDY LATIN?

Perhaps you might like to consider the following points when coming to a decision on your daughter's options:

  • The Junior Certificate Course provides the foundation for learning the Latin language, the parent of French, Spanish, Italian, and other Romance languages . The study of Latin enhances the student's understanding of other languages, including English.
  • Learning how people communicate with each other is a very important part of one's education, but Latin involves far more than grammar and vocabulary. Students of Latin will explore Roman myth and legend, learn how English words come into being and what they mean, visit the world as it was centuries ago and master the fundamentals of the Latin language.
  • Special attention is given to the daily life and society of the Romans and the influences they exert on many aspects of our culture e.g. Architecture, Art, Literature, Philosophy and Politics.
  • The Leaving Certificate Course builds on the work already done. Specialised grammatical points are studied, together with major selections from Latin literature. Roman History and Civilisation will be studied in greater depth.
  • In general Latin is a first class exercise for the mind. It encourages a logical, analytical approach in the student.