Online Prospectus

Fáilte & Welcome

Céad Míle Fáilte to all our readers, whether parent, student, teacher, past student or someone interested to find out about our fine College.


Read More

Maths

projectmathslogo.jpg
Learning maths is fun
http://www.mathsisfun.com/fractions-menu.html





Pizza is divided into 8 portions. Where has 1/8th gone??
dscf1557.jpg


dscf1554.jpg


dscf1556.jpg


























What is the most popular colour?

dscf1553.jpg

















Why did the m&m go to school?                                                           To beome a smartie!!!



Maths Week in Dominican College


Maths Week in Dominican College aims to raise awareness, appreciation and understanding of mathematics for all. Maths is needed in today's world and those people with poor proficiency in Maths will be disadvantaged in life. In addition we need to encourage more young people to work harder at Maths in school to progress on to areas such as Maths itself,
engineering, science, accountancy etc. All too common we hear people say "I can't do Maths" and this leads to an idea that you have to be hardwired for Maths. Of course, not everyone will become a top mathematician but everyone can do better than they do and many could learn to enjoy Maths if we can break this "cycle of fear". The events of Maths Week are designed to present Maths as interesting, challenging and yet rewarding - and yes, even fun! Link : www.mathsweek.ie

A TIMETABLE OF EVENTS PROMOTING MATHS WEEK IN DOMINICAN COLLEGE OCT 12TH – 17TH 2009

EVENT
DATE
TARGET YEAR GROUP
Prizes
“Magic of Maths” Lecture in RDS
Monday Oct 12th
ALL TY’S
N/A
Math’s Quiz
-powerpoint
Wednesday Oct 14th
-All First Years, during class time
Prize at Assembly following week
Math’s Quiz
-powerpoint
Wednesday Oct 14th
All Second Years during class time

Prize at Assembly following week
Sudoka
Thursday Oct 15th
All Students
-In Library at lunch time.
-Interested students must give their names to
Ms. Tracy or Ms. Mohan
-Winners announced Friday 325pm over PA.
-Collect prize then
Brainteasers on line
Math’s Week
Last day to submit  Thurs 14th
All Classes
- e-mail your answer to :
(email will be updated shortly)
-Winners announced Friday 325pm over PA.
-Collect prize then
Poster Competition
Due Tues Oct 13th
1st Years
Prize at Assembly following week
Brainteasers in class
Every Day
Non- Exam Classes





Why study Mathematics?

Mathematics is about developing an understanding of numbers and measuring. It helps to prepare for many practical aspects of day-to-day living. It enables the learner to think logically and solve problems, which are skills for life. Engineering, computing, architecture, business and, in fact, every possible career choice will involve one or more aspects of Mathematics. Without Maths, we would not have the technology to surf the Internet, build a bridge, weigh ourselves, design or manufacture a car, fly an aeroplane, use a mobile phone…

What is the best way to study Mathematics?

A common problem faced by students of Mathematics is that when presented with a Maths problem, it can be hard to establish a correct starting point. When prompted in class by a teacher or fellow student, they know how to complete the task but without that assistance at home can feel very lost. It is essential to take useful notes and tips from class, which can easily be understood later. This will prove invaluable when studying at home.

How should Maths be studied at home?

Revise the material learned in class that day. This should include:
1. Mathematical concepts.
2. new Mathematical terms/vocabulary.
3. working through examples shown in class.

Use examples from the textbook and class to help you but make every effort to understand them instead of just trying to make your exercises look like the examples.

Answer the homework questions by showing the methodology used as well as the answers. When a question is completed, always ensure that the answer makes sense. Eg. Make sure that a table that you should calculate to be 2m in length is not found to be 2cm or 20m!

Remember........................
The best way to study Mathematics is to actually work out questions for yourself.

Useful Websites for Mathematics

A very comprehensive gateway site (a site that categorises and links to lots of other sites). It contains sections on:
General Topics, Geometry, Fractals, History of Mathematics and Mathematical Software
http://www.tc.cornell.edu/EDU/MathSciGateway/general.asp

Some fun numeracy games here can be played online. A good way to practise against the clock!
http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/megamaths/

This is part of one of the most famous sites for mathematics education: the Maths Forum at Swarthmore. There are many categorised links to other pages.
http://mathforum.org/library/

This is a search engine and yields Yahoo's categorisation of many mathematical sites.
http://dir.yahoo.com/science/mathematics/

This site is loaded with problems and games for both teachers and students. It is definitely worth a look!
http://www.mathgoodies.com/

This site contains multiple levels of games for any age group. All are colourful and easy to follow.
http://www.coolmath.com/

Latin

Welcome to the Latin Web Page


We offer Latin to all First Year Students entering Dominican College. This is conditional on a sufficient number of students opting for Latin to allow us to form a class. Latin is not offered in any other Girls Secondary School on the north side of the city.

  • All students taking Latin will continue to completion of the Junior Certificate course at the end of Third Year.
  • Leaving Certificate Latin is also offered at Dominican College. This, of course is conditional on a sufficient number of students opting for this subject.


WHY SHOULD YOUR DAUGHTER STUDY LATIN?

Perhaps you might like to consider the following points when coming to a decision on your daughter's options:

  • The Junior Certificate Course provides the foundation for learning the Latin language, the parent of French, Spanish, Italian, and other Romance languages . The study of Latin enhances the student's understanding of other languages, including English.
  • Learning how people communicate with each other is a very important part of one's education, but Latin involves far more than grammar and vocabulary. Students of Latin will explore Roman myth and legend, learn how English words come into being and what they mean, visit the world as it was centuries ago and master the fundamentals of the Latin language.
  • Special attention is given to the daily life and society of the Romans and the influences they exert on many aspects of our culture e.g. Architecture, Art, Literature, Philosophy and Politics.
  • The Leaving Certificate Course builds on the work already done. Specialised grammatical points are studied, together with major selections from Latin literature. Roman History and Civilisation will be studied in greater depth.
  • In general Latin is a first class exercise for the mind. It encourages a logical, analytical approach in the student.

History

The following is an outline of the Junior Certificate course:

1st Year

  • Archaeology
  • Ancient Ireland
  • Ancient Civilisation
  • Celts
  • Bronze Age
  • Stone Age
  • Iron Age
  • Monks and Monasteries
  • Norman Ireland
  • Viking Ireland
  • Renaissance

2nd Year

  • Reformation
  • Counter Reformation
  • French Revolution
  • American Revolution
  • Irish Revolution
  • Industrial Revolution
  • Agricultural Revolution
  • The Famine


3rd Year

  • Modern Irish and European History (1870-1970)
  • 1916 Rising
  • The Irish Free State
  • World War 1
  • The Rise of Hitler
  • The Rise of Mussolini
  • World War 2
  • Cold War
  • Setting up of the E.U.

Transition Year History:

In Transition Year you get a chance to do different things than you usually would in the Junior or Leaving certificate course. At the start of the year (October 2002), we all did projects on 'Famous Irish Woman in History'. We also study Jewish History.


Leaving Certfiicate History:

Students study Irish and European History from 1870 to 1970. One of the most exciting parts of the leaving cert course is the research topic, where students get a chance to research a topic in history which interests them most.

History Trips:

The History department organizes several history trips each year. These include trips to The Dáil, Kilmainham Gaol, The Irish Jewish Museum, Glendalough and The National Museum at Collins Barracks.

Home Economics

https://sites.google.com/site/dcgahomeec/

Home Economics has a direct relevance to the present and future life of every young person.

Its purpose is to equip young people in certain important skills for living as individuals and of establishing and developing a stable environment for their families. It encompasses studies of many of the processes, which are necessary for day to day living.

The main areas focus on:

  • Food Studies and Culinary Skills
  • Consumer Studies
  • Social & Health Studies
  • Resource Management and Home Studies
  • Textile Studies

The syllabus is offered at two levels, Ordinary and Higher.

One optional study will be chosen from the following three areas.

  • Childcare
  • Design and Craftwork
  • Textile skills

Emphasis throughout the course is on management, creativity and living skills. This is to ensure that the young person taking the course will be equipped for the personal independence and be able to take shared responsibility in the household and community in which she lives.

TY Home Economics:
Cooking in Home-Ec in TY gives students a chance to learn skills that would not be used in a classroom environment. Some of the cooking is based on modules in the Home-Ec course like making a Starter, Main Course and Dessert that fit the healthy eating guidelines. Other types of cooking we do are based on special occasions eg. Halloween and Christmas where we did pumpkin carving and pumpkin soup, and also Christmas chocolate yule log, shortbread, and mince pies. In the New Year, the classes are also taking part in the ‘Take Away My Way’ competition, where we chose a dish from the take away and try to make it cheaper and healthier.
By Michelle Hayden 4. 2

 18th_nov_002_112x150.jpg 18th_nov_018_112x150.jpg   18th_nov_021_200x150.jpg
 18th_nov_043_200x150.jpg  18th_nov_044_200x150.jpg  18th_nov_045_200x150.jpg
 18th_nov_041_112x150.jpg  18th_nov_046_200x150.jpg  21st_october_pics_064_112x150.jpg
 21st_october_pics_070_112x150.jpg  21st_october_pics_071_112x150.jpg  21st_october_pics_072_112x150.jpg
 21st_october_pics_073_112x150.jpg  21st_october_pics_074_112x150.jpg  21st_october_pics_075_200x150.jpg

German

The Leaving Certificate syllabus for German allows for the following four broad outcomes:

  • A communicatve ability in German.
  • An awareness about language and communication.
  • An awareness of the culture associated with the German language.

Assessment

The leaving Certificate student is being assessed at three levels :

1. Oral (25 % for honours and 20 % for ordinary level). The following criteria is used to assess oral competence:

  • Range of vocabulary.
  • Range of expression.
  • Awareness and use of grammar.
  • Independence from examiner support.
  • Appropriateness.
  • Fluency.
  • Pronunciation.

2. Aural (20% for honours and 25% for ordinary level)

3. Comprehension and Written sections. The following criteria is used to assess the written production:

At higher level :

  • Range and appropriateness of vocabulary
  • Range and accuracy in use of structures
  • Development and/or manipulation of stimulus
  • Organisation of content

At ordinary level:

  • Intelligibility of message.
  • Development and/or manipulation of stimulus.
  • Awareness and use of grammar.
  • Range of vocabulary.

For further information on Leaving Certificate or Junior Certificate see: http://www.irlgov.ie/educ/Exams/exams/htm

German Exchange

An exchange has been offered every second year to Transition and Fifth Year students. On this exchange, students are accompanied by a German teacher and stay with their exchange family for about 10 days. During this time, they attend school in the mornings and go on trips in the afternoons.

The advantages of this exchange system are:

  • Full immersion in the target language is assured.
  • A greater appreciation of the culture of the country is fostered, by socialising exclusively, or almost exclusively, with German students and their families.
  • Costs are limited to airfare, trip costs, and spending money.

For further information see http://www.oranienschule.de

German Teachers Visit Dominican College

On 8 September 2016 two visiting teachers, Christina Strube and Bianca Hofmann from Passau, Germany came to visit Dominican College. They are English teachers in the Gymnasium Pfarrkirchen Passau, which is a German secondary school.

They gave us a presentation on the city of Passau and showed us a video on school life in Germany. We learnt many new things and some of the most interesting facts were that when children start school they are given a cone-shaped bag filled with school stationery and delicious treats (we wish we were German!). This cone is called a Schultüte.

Another fact is that in Germany you are only allowed to cut your lawn before 1pm on a Saturday and not at all on a Sunday (thank God we are not German!). This is because Sunday is regarded as a day of rest where people have no disruption (so no lie-ins on a Saturday!). Shops generally remain shut on a Sunday as well.

We also learned that three main German rivers flow through Passau: the Danube, the Inn and the Ilz. Each river appears a different colour at their confluence. The world's largest church organ can be found in the catherdral in Passau.

This was a great learning experience for us and we now have a better understanding of German school life and the city of Passau.

By Molly Barrett and Aifric Mangan

Germanteachers Copy

M.F.L. Talk

On Thursday the 29th of September, everyone in 4th and 5th year were lucky enough to listen to a talk about all the opportunities we have to learn languages outside the classroom, and even outside the country.

We heard from two fantastic speakers. Firstly, Neasa Candon, who graduated from Dominican's only three years ago, told us all about her gap year in Konstanz in Germany before beginning her time at Trinity College. She shared a lot of valuable advice and addressed a lot of the apprehensions we could have about going abroad, from fluency to leaving behind our friends and family. She told us all about how she improved her German, and also met some of her closest friends during her time in Germany and how the time away from school helped her to grow.

Then next we heard from Conor from Stein Study, an organisation for learning languages abroad. He told us about all the opportunities they offer for transition year and fifth year students to do group trips and leaving cert prep courses across Europe to develop their fluency. He also gave us some really useful leaflets so we can look over all that Stein Study offer.

There were so many opportunities that I'd never thought about before, such as being a teaching assistant in English classes and doing an Erasmus year. Everyone really enjoyed listening to the stories and advice and I think we all benefited from it. (Jessica Dunne, 5.3)